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Hi I’m English Teacher Fred and this is an English grammar lesson all about the word know. Okay? We’re going to talk about grammar patterns, collocations and set phrases all about the word “know”.

Let’s begin! Here’s the first grammar pattern. In this grammar pattern there is the word know plus a noun phrase and then possibly plus an adverb. For example, I know him well. I know him very well. Here’s the word know and then here’s a noun phrase and then here’s an adverb. I know him well. They know each other very well or they know each other just a little bit, they don’t know each other well. How long have you known David? Have you known him for a long time or a short time? And another one, her whereabouts are not known. We don’t know where she is. So you use this grammar pattern to talk about your familiarity with something, to talk about something that you know.

Here’s grammar pattern number two. This grammar pattern uses know plus a noun phrase plus about and then plus another noun phrase. This first noun phrase is optional. Maybe it has this one or maybe not. Okay, here’s an example: he doesn’t know about the layoffs. Here’s know and then here’s about and then here’s a noun phrase. Or, not much is known about Pluto. Pluto is a planet very far from Earth, we don’t know much about it, not much is known about Pluto. I know something about your brother. Or one more: how much do you know about it? In this example here, it has both the noun phrases. See here, know plus a noun phrase plus about plus another noun phrase. I know something about your brother. You use this grammar pattern when you want to talk about your knowledge of a subject or a topic, when you want to talk about what you know about something.

Okay, how about grammar pattern number three. This grammar pattern uses no plus of plus a noun phrase. Do you know of anyone who might want to buy this? Know of anyone. I don’t actually know her, but I know of her. I don’t really know her but I know of her, has the same meaning as about. Like I don’t actually know her but I know about her. It means you are talking about general but not detailed knowledge, okay? I don’t really know her in detail, exactly, but I know of her. I know that she exists. I know something about her but not very much. Okay? I know of her but I don’t really know her. This is know plus of. I know of something means I know about it, I know a little, but I don’t know exactly.

Okay, here’s grammar pattern number four. This one uses know plus a that clause. Did you know that he is American? Did you know? Did you know that he is from Germany? If only I’d known that it’s your birthday, if only I’d known that it’s your birthday. I knew that he was lying. Here is know plus a that clause, know that something. Use this one to talk about general but not detailed knowledge of something or someone.

All right, what’s grammar pattern number five. Grammar pattern number five is know plus a WH clause. WH is the question words: who what when where why and how. Now, how doesn’t begin with W but we still call it a W word. These are question words: who what when where why and how. Okay? So here’s an example: do you know where the bank is? Here’s know plus a WH word, a question word. I don’t know why he likes her. This one: why. She doesn’t know how much I love her. She doesn’t know how much I love her, I love her so much. See, this one is also… We call it a W word but actually it begins with an H. It’s a question word. She doesn’t know how much I love her. How much, how many, those are also question words. You use this grammar pattern to talk about your familiarity with the circumstances. It means your familiarity with the situation, the whole situation. The situation is: I love her and I want to talk about it. She doesn’t know how much I love her, she doesn’t know why I love her.

Next grammar pattern is grammar pattern number six. This grammar pattern uses know plus here’s the question word again and then a to infinitive. Do you know how to drive? I don’t know what to say. See, here’s know plus a question word and then a to infinitive. Now this last one, I don’t know how to love him, it has the quotation marks. I used quotation marks because this is a sentence from a song. I won’t sing it, that would be very dangerous. But this is a sentence from the song, from the the musical play “Jesus Christ Superstar.” A very famous song, it’s Mary singing about Jesus and she says I don’t know how to love him. Okay, so you use this grammar pattern to talk about skills or knowledge of what to do. You know how to do something, you know why to do something, you know when to do something. Do you know how to fix this? It’s broken. So, your knowledge or skills.

Next grammar pattern? Oops, no that was all. Grammar pattern number six is the last one, and now we will talk about collocations with the word know. These are words that go together with know.

The first kind is know plus adverbs. Like exactly, for certain, for sure, full well, perfectly well, very well. I know exactly what you mean. I know exactly. Know plus an adverb. I don’t know for sure, I’m not sure. I don’t know for sure is same meaning as I’m not sure. I don’t know for sure but I think his name is Gary. But I don’t know for sure. See, this is using this adverb: for sure. She knows full well, she knows full well that she should be doing her homework. You know full well that that’s not the right thing to do. You know perfectly well, you know exactly, you know for certain. Know for sure. This is know plus adverbs. These are very common phrases.

Next is more collocations. These ones use know plus a verb like let or get. If you need anything else just let me know. I’d like to get to know her better. Get to know or let me know these are also very common.

What’s next? Set phrases. This is the first group of set phrases. These are phrases that are so common that they become set. These are very common phrases. I know! I know, it means I agree, the same as I agree. This movie is terrible! Yeah, I know. I know, that means I agree. Yeah, uh huh, I know. Or, I don’t know, the opposite, I don’t agree. This movie is great! I don’t know. Means I don’t really agree with you. And it’s sort of a polite, it’s a polite way to say that you don’t agree. If somebody said, “This movie is great!” And you said, “No it’s not. It’s terrible.” It’s kind of, not very polite. But if somebody said, “This movie is great!” And then you say, “I don’t know, I’m not sure.” You’re disagreeing but it’s polite, it’s indirect.

Okay, here’s another one: you know what I mean? Joe is a little strange, you know what I mean? Do you know what I mean? So it’s sort of asking for agreement, or saying… Basically it means do you know what I mean? He’s a little strange, you know what I mean? This is the American accident- not “accident”, “accent”- American accent: you know what I mean?

Okay, here’s some more set phrases. Set phrases number two. This is three different ways to use you know. The first way to emphasize: you should try harder, you know? We should really eat lunch, you know? You’re making it stronger. Emphasize means making it stronger. Number two, to give extra information: it’s him, you know, that guy in your class. You know. And usually the intonation, the pronunciation is like this: you know. It’s him, you know, that guy in your class. Because I’m going to give you more information. It’s him, and I’m going to say more, you know, that guy in our class. That guy in our class is more information, extra information. It’s him. You know, that guy. I can’t remember his name.

The last one, number three, is to fill a pause. Because there’s a pause in the conversation but you don’t want to be completely silent, so you fill the pause with you know, you know. I’m talking about that guy, you know, you know… Because I’m thinking so I’m pausing. You know, you know, you know… It’s a way to put some words in the pause.

Next is some more set phrases. Number three: you never know. You’d better take an umbrella. It’s sunny now, but you never know. See, things may change, you never know. Now it’s sunny but you never know, it could rain. Or not that I know of, means I’m not sure but I don’t think so, I think not. Do we have a meeting today? Not that I know of. It’s possible and maybe we do but I don’t know. And the last one is two more set phrases. As far as I know: I think so but I might be wrong. As far as I know this is the only Mexican restaurant in town. Or, one more, because of what I know about him. It’s time to start but, knowing John, he’ll come late. Because he’s always late. It’s time to start but knowing him, he’ll be late. Because of what I know about him. Okay?

That’s all! That’s the end of grammar with the word know. Come by EnglishTeacherFred.com, okay? Have a nice day. Bye-bye.

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