Here are three idioms to talk about when a child is the same as the parents. Okay?

You’re saying the son or the daughter is same as the mother or the father. First one is, “the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree”.

Do you get it? “The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.” So, you see a girl and she’s very naughty but you know that her mother’s also kind of bad, sort of naughty, so you say, “Well, the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree, you know.”
So, the daughter is like the mother: the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

There’s an apple tree. The apples, they go… And they fall right next to the tree; they don’t go far away. The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree: she’s just like her mother, or he’s just like his father. She’s just like her parents; he’s just like his parents.
Another thing people say is: “Like father, like son.” It’s not used for girls; it’s father and son. “Well, like father like son.” It just means that the son is the same as the father. Like father, like son. “Well, you know, ‘Like father, like son.’”

Another one is: “A chip off the old block.” So it’s as if the father was a big piece of… rock. The block, you know? And then the chip, you hammer a chip. Ding ding ding. And a chip… You hit it with a hammer, hit a big rock with a hammer. And a little rock falls off. A chip. The little rock is a “chip”. Okay? A chip off the old block.

So the old block is the father and the little chip, a chip falls off. A chip off the old block.

“He’s a chip off the old block.” He’s just like his father.

“The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.” This one, about the apple, is often used when you’re saying something bad. You want to say, well, the mother or father was not good and look, now the son or daughter is also not good: “Well, you know, the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree…. You know?”

It’s sort of a way to say that the child is bad because they are the same as the parent, but it’s kind of… Not actually polite but you’re saying it in a way that is not really mean, you know? You could say something like: “Well, she’s really bad because her mother’s bad.” But a softer way to say it: the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. It’s a little bit funny, a little bit softer, not as impolite as saying it directly. It’s an indirect way to say it.

The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.
Like father, like son.
A chip off the old block.
All are English idioms to say that a child is the same as their mother or father.

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